Look at my cluttered desktop above (click on the JPEG to see the screenshop taken with SnagIt). Cluttered with Web 2.0 tools waiting for me to fully master, evaluate, and teach.

Doggy is snoring by my feet. My First Year Seminar students are sending me their first formal blogs as I type this. So far I am pleased by their efforts.

I’m pondering whether I should request release time of two course next year to more fully develop my mastery of these Web 2.0 tools and to promulgate their use to other faculty and interested students. Every day I discover a new application which has high potential for learners. What do you think> Cast a vote.

So much to learn. Should I give up two classes next year and in return use taht time to become a Web 3.0 tools educator for all interested faculty and students? Write a book? It’s a tempting idea since time is such a precious commodity and i think that i now have the knowledge base, the momentum, and the student talent. Carpe diem?

There are so many NEAT and potentially useful gadgets. And I believe that the potential readers of this blog actually know that if there is a hypertext link, they might be rewarded by clicking it!

Here for example is a way for students to search for Psychology topics on the Social Psychology Network.

Time to return through the Looking Glass. (Ask Alice).
Even more curious in Carroll Land and seeking help.

Posted by Professor David Simpson

Professor of Psychology, Carroll University (USA), Lover of Dogs, Reading, Teaching and Learning. Looking for ways to enhance cross-global communication and to apply technology learning tools.

4 Comments

  1. Dear Lurking, First, thanks for all your support— especially the past two years. I do feel that the time is right for proceeding in this fashion. I would give up two Introductory Psychology classes (one each semester) — but the payback to Carroll (and the time-payback to me) I think would be immediate and long-lasting. I would always welcome staff support and already know of a number of excellent potential student contributors. I’m still pondering aloud so feel free to share my thoughts with anyone you think might be interest. Thanks for your vote of confident. YOUR vote has quite a bit of weight with me.

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  2. I refer to these sentences, “I’m pondering whether I should request release time of two course next year to more fully develop my mastery of these Web 2.0 tools and to promulgate their use to other faculty and interested students. Every day I discover a new application which has high potential for learners. What do you think? Cast a vote.” I vote YES. Some faculty member needs to get a firm grip on these tools and teach the faculty. BUT, that takes an excellent teacher out of the classroom. Could this be done in less time on your part with the (paid) assistance of a student or ed grad student or other staff help? (Librarians leap to mind…)

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  3. I value your feedback and treasure your patience as I “think” out loud. I think that your caveat is very important. I also worry about the implications and complications of plagiarism. D.

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  4. After looking through the website and watching the short tutorial, I am very impressed with this new application i-lighter. There have been numerous times when I’ve been collecting research on the web and struggled to keep all my sources and information straight. I especially like that you can save your pages and email them to other people to share information-it is yet another technological way to connect people. My only caution is to not let i-lighter become the only way to review sources and collect information when on the web. Because reading online can too often result in not looking at the information carefully enough, sometimes one needs to print articles and read the text on paper in order to avoid misinterpretation and to really understand the information at hand.

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