Category: App Generation

App GenerationCarroll ReflectionsCurious DavidStarQuizteaching statistics

On Engaging Students (Part 2): Adventures with StarQuiz and SPSS


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Good recent research suggests that repeated testing enhances learning. How can I best incorporate those important findings into my courses? As a beginning, I have revisited a piece of software,StarQuiz, (originally developed by a high school student) that has proven useful and reliable since I discovered it about 10 years ago. There is something comforting about using a piece of software for almost 15 years and across many evolving operating systems without a glitch.

I am considering incorporating it into my PSY205 “Statistics and Experimental Design Course” —if the students can demonstrate to methat it enhances their mastery of the course’s material. I welcome student feedback—and suggestions from other readers of software they consider better.

To try it enter your name—you need not enter your email address. If a “David” has already tried it, enter a different name (e.g. Voldemoort).

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Here is a link to one of the two practice tests I shared with students in my class today. I encouraged students to collaborate, use notes, and be mutually supportive of each other in the process.

Here is a link to a second example which I introduced in my class.

And here is a review of SPSS (with bloopers!) Keep those constructive comments coming

                     (and you international viewers, I welcome your comments, too).

App GenerationAppsCurious DavidJane Hart's Top 100 Learning ToolsPersonal Learning Tools

Reading, Writing, and Watching User Manuals

whetting-my--app-etite----too-many-apps

Maybe it is my aging. Maybe it is a lack of motivation. Maybe it is a lack of focus on my part. Gone are the times when I used to master a new piece of software or a new computer in a few hours—exploring every drop down menu. Gone is my ability (or the time needed) to write a succinct user’s guide for the new machine and feel comfortable being a resident expert of its capabilities. Ah, my TRS 80 Level I machine—sometimes I miss you!

Fortunately now there are increasingly available excellent screencasts which clearly explain features of software. I find of special value MacMost Videos, Screencastsonline.com, and the superb presentations by David Sparks. When I am producing my own screencast I find most useful Screenflow though I am becoming impressed with Clarify‘s didactic potential.

Just downloaded the new OSX Yosemite Operating System onto one of my Mac’s. I find that it is worth the investment to purchase online tutorials that hand-hold one through the different features. I’ll have my undergraduate research assistants go through them before we install it on one of my office machines. In the interim I need to cycle through all my apps and see which ones work with the new OS, which don’t but are essential for my needs, and which ones I no longer need or have totally forgotten



App GenerationAppsClutterCurious David

Treating Appluenza

Too many apps. I am on a decluttering mission. I am especially interested in keeping (cross-platform and cross browser) software that enhances my capabilities for writing, screencasting, and facilitating global communication.

First I shall revisit each application and attempt to answer these questions:

  1. Why it is on my machine? Was it pre-installed? Perhaps it was very favorably reviewed? Am I keeping it because of nostalgia? Have I forgotten that it is there? How often have I used it? Updated it?
  2. What needs or research interests did it address at the time I installed it? Do these needs or interests still exist? Are these needs likely to continue over the remaining years of my teaching?
  3. How well does does the application address these needs compared to other applications that I have since “collected”?
  4. Is it likely to work with the new Mac “Yosmite” operating system?

Here are the applications I am reviewing:

  1. 1-Password
  2. Adobe Reader
  3. Alarm Clock Pro
  4. Amazon Music
  5. Anki (flash card program)
  6. App Store
  7. Automator
  8. AVG Cleaner
  9. Battery Health
  10. Boingo Wi-Fi Finder
  11. Book Proofer
  12. Boom
  13. Logitech Broadcaster
  14. Calculator
  15. Calendar
  16. Calibre
  17. CallNote
  18. Camtasia2 (Mac)
  19. Chess
  20. Clarify
  21. Cloud
  22. Comic Life 3
  23. Contacts
  24. Crazy Talk 7
  25. Dashboard
  26. Data Rescue 3
  27. Day One
  28. Delicious Library
  29. Dictionary
  30. Disk Doctor
  31. Drive Genius 3
  32. Drop Box
  33. DupeGuru PE
  34. Duplicate Detective
  35. DVD Player
  36. EasyBatch Photo
  37. Evernote
  38. FaceTime
  39. FamilyTree Maker 3 Mac
  40. FireFox
  41. FlipPlayer2
  42. FontBook
  43. Freedom
  44. Fuze
  45. G*Power
  46. Game Center
  47. Garage Band
  48. Glui
  49. Google Chrome
  50. Google Drive
  51. Google Earth
  52. Google Backup
  53. Hello, Tips, Tricks and Secrets *
  54. Ibooks
  55. Ibooks Author
  56. Image Capture
  57. IMovie
  58. Inform
  59. IPhoto
  60. ISoft Video Converter
  61. Itunes
  62. ITunes Producer
  63. Jing
  64. KeyNote
  65. Kindle
  66. LaunchPad
  67. Leaf
  68. Learn IbooksAuthor
  69. Learn Mac OS Lion
  70. Learn Mac OSX Maverick
  71. Learn Mac
  72. LibrarianPro
  73. Logitech
  74. MacCleanse
  75. MacFamilyTree 7
  76. MacJournal
  77. MacKeeper
  78. MacOptimizer
  79. MacPilot
  80. MacUpdate DeskTop
  81. Mail
  82. MailtabPro for Gmail
  83. MemoryKeeper
  84. Messages
  85. Microsoft Messenger
  86. Microsoft Office
  87. Microsoft Silverlight
  88. Mint Quickview
  89. Miro
  90. Missio Control
  91. Moose
  92. Movie Tools
  93. Notebook
  94. Notes
  95. Numbers
  96. OmniOutliner
  97. OOVoo
  98. Opera
  99. Pages
  100. PdfPen
  101. Photobooth
  102. Picassa
  103. Pins
  104. PixelPumper
  105. Pocket
  106. Posterino
  107. Preview
  108. PulpMotionr3
  109. Quicken Essentials
  110. QuickTime Player
  111. RadioShift
  112. RapidReader
  113. ReadLater
  114. RealPlayer Converter
  115. Reflector
  116. Reminders
  117. Remote DeskTop Connection
  118. Safari
  119. Sandbox Cleaner
  120. Screenflow
  121. ScreenSteps
  122. Scrivener
  123. SecondLife Viewer
  124. Shape Collage
  125. Share Bucket
  126. Showcase
  127. Skitch
  128. Skype
  129. SnapConverter
  130. SnagIt
  131. SnapxPro
  132. Soundboard
  133. Soundflower
  134. SplashtopStreamer
  135. StarQuiz
  136. Stat
  137. Stickies
  138. Tapedeck
  139. Techtool Pro 7
  140. TechTool Protogo
  141. TextEdit
  142. TextExpander
  143. Textwrangler
  144. TimeMachine
  145. TurboTax
  146. Tutor for Imovie11
  147. Tutor for Iphoto11
  148. Tutor for Lion
  149. Tutor for OSX Mavericks
  150. Tweetbot
  151. TweetDeck
  152. Universal translator
  153. Utilities Folder
  154. Video Guide to Mac Lion
  155. Voila
  156. Vox
  157. Wallpaper
  158. WashingMachine
  159. WD Drive utilities
  160. WePrint Server
  161. Wimba Diploma 6
  162. Wiretap Studio
  163. WorldClock Deluxe
  164. Zotero



App GenerationAppsCurious David

Tool Winnowing 201:Treating APP Affluenza

*Tools1

Too much stuff. An embarrassment of riches: Books; office supplies; projects; computers; planners for organizing my life:). Too much either wasted or neglected: space; knowledge unshared; time; opportunities; networking.

Inspired in part by the first chapter of Gretchen Rubin’s well written and thought provoking The Happiness Project and in part by my panicking that it is almost time to return to campus to teach, I’m focusing today on (again!) winnowing applications. I doubt that I can change my app-collecting habits (but, reflecting on Patrick Lindsay’s little book of self-help inspirational nudges It’s Never Too Late…172 simple acts to change your life,)—maybe I CAN change. It’s time to reconsider the ideas of “Essentialism“—with a grain of salt. I enjoy too much having many interests, many simultaneous projects, and continuous learning opportunities.

But do I REALLY need so many tools overlapping (or duplicative) in function that as a consequence of their sheer number or my changing interests I never master, I fail to update, or I forget that I possess?:)

Especially with the new Mac Operating system imminent, it’s time for some app-revisiting.

Time to focus.

Today I focus on screencasting/ screen capturing/ video producing apps among them

  • Screenflow
  • Screensteps
  • Skitch
  • Snagit
  • Snapzpro
  • Voila
  • Camtasia
  • Jing
  • Imovie
  • Clarify
  • Pulpmotion3



App GenerationBloggingCurious DavidJane Hart's Top 100 Learning Tools

What evidence is there that collaborative, engaging, Web 2.0 tools indeed enhance learning?

This thought piece  has been slightly revised from a blog piece I wrote a number of years ago for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel under the name “Curious David” when I was a community educational blogger for them.

I’m nervous and excited. Time to take off my invisibility cloak. Tomorrow (Tuesday, September 2, 2008 at 8:00 a.m.) I meet in person for the first time with my 20 first-year students. What an immense responsibility to be their first professor!

We’re going to explore “21rst century” learning tools such as blogs, wikis, podcasts, social networks, virtual worlds, and YouTube. The idea for this course emerged from my experiences writing this “Curious David” blog column. Last year’s opportunity to write for “JSonline” was transformative for me as I learned from elementary and secondary school teachers, high school students, virtual school advocates, retired faculty and readers about innovations, challenges and successes they faced promoting learning.

In this first-year seminar we shall focus on some of the 25 free learning tools described by educator Jane Hart. [Here is an updated list I would draw upon were I to teach this course again.]  As we examine these learning tools we hope to answer questions such as these:

  1. To what degree can these web tools truly enhance student learning?
  2. To what degree are they just “cool” tools?
  3. Could they be used to develop critical thinking?
  4. Do they improve or degrade communication skills?
  5. Might they be applied to fostering cross-cultural or international understanding?
  6. Might they strengthen or weaken writing skills?
  7. What are their weaknesses or dangers?
  8. Should they complement or replace 20th century learning skills/tools?
  9. How can one evaluate their effectiveness?

[It seems to me it should be possible to produce an evidence-based paper like this to address the questions above.]

 My intent is to assist students in the transition from high school to college—and to investigate Web 2.0 learning tools which might be useful across classes and in the workplace. I want to involve them in educational experiences that will develop and enhance abilities in reading, writing, reflecting, presenting, thinking, and producing. Writing exercises will include short in-class and out-of-class reaction papers, journals, blogs/wikis, and exams. Presentations will be both formal and informal; individual and in small groups. Collaboration will be both with fellow students and with me.

Still Curious,

David


App GenerationBloggingCarroll ReflectionsCurious DavidJane Hart's Top 100 Learning Tools

David’s Wayback Machine – Pioneering Web 2.0 Technology Tools (Part 1) Jan 6, 2009

There was a time when I kept rough drafts of everything I wrote. Now, I am no longer in that habit and am in the process of cleaning out all my files (both electronic and legal-pad format). It is amusing to (re)discover some early writings when I thought I was at the leading edge of knowing about, sharing, and using “technology learning tools”
     I find interesting the existence of the Internet Wayback archive project, though I’m uneasy about such a huge amount of Internet detritus (especially my own) using up cyberspace. Recently I’ve made time to attempt to clean up my own Internet garbage (old accounts, false starts on blogs). With some amusement I rediscovered some of my first efforts to promulgate into the classroom technology tools with 25 Carroll freshmen.  (I have chosen NOT to revive the dead links in this piece).

Original 2009 piece follows here:

Historic First Meeting in Second Life

I’ve begun developing a presentation I’m scheduled to give on January 16 to Carroll faculty tentatively titled “Pioneering Web 2.0 Learning Tools with Carroll Students: Educational Technology of the Future, Catching Up with What Fifth-Graders Already Know, or Another Fad? “I hope to share with interested members of the Carroll community some of the Web 2.0 learning tools and resources that I have explored this past semester(Download FYS 100 Section U Syllabus – Dr, David Simpson Labor Day Version PDF with my students (who were especially playful with their photoshop skills).

Simpson

I am toying with the idea of showing what I can NOW do in some kind of class—possibly for alumni or faculty.  I would draw upon my knowledge gained since 2009 about the application of technology learning tools—especially drawing upon resources like this?  Anybody interested? If so, email me—or send me a message via owl.

 


App GenerationBloggingbook-writingCarroll University USACurious David

Three Digital Tools in Need of My Sharpening

I’m in the process of revisiting several resources that have influenced my choice of online teaching tools. This post focuses on the book by Steve Johnson (2011)—a thoughtful and concise compendium of his thinking about today’s “tech-savvy” (high school age) learners and how to prepare them for their digital future. He systematically  evaluates over 30 “etools” he judges to be useful for engendering collaboration, creation, and publication across the curriculum, and offers concrete suggestions for how to get started (and how to keep up) as an instructor. Among the many tools that he recommends that I have personally found especially useful for my teaching at the college/university level are the following:

  1. I have grown to like Animoto as a vehicle for creating and sharing video-like productions, despite its constraints of needing to use Adobe Flash and accepting only MP3 formatted music files. I have elected to have an educational account with them. Here is an example of how I have used it.
  2. WordPress is now my blogging tool of choice and the blogging tool that I teach to students. I myself move back and forth between WordPress.com (“David in Carroll Land”) and WordPres.org  (“Curious David in Carroll Land”). The latter gives me far more creative freedom (e.g. the use of plugins) but at an additional cost (both financial and time I need to devote to its higher learning-curve). Here is an example of a WordPress.com blog piece in which my student research assistants shared  “sand box” activities while they explored for me the value of some beta version software which showed promise to me of eventually being useful in the classroom.  Here, on the other hand, is a recent blog piece co-written with my students using the WordPress.org blogging software (which I still am at an early stage of mastering). Without doubt, my best etool  evaluators are my highly trained student assistants.
  3. Google Docs is becoming an increasingly important tool for me. Indeed, I would love to devote the time to create a Google Apps course for our students.  Richard Bryne, an educator thought leader whom I follow on Twitter and whose contributions I benefit from, has created a wonderful comprehensive guide to this tool.

Presently my students are more facile with this learning tool than I!.  We regularly use it as a means of collaborating and sharing documents —photos, videos, journal articles, rough drafts, spreadsheets. Just today one of my senior research seminar students shared with me, on Google Drive, a wonderful video she had made of her interviewing her twelve-year-old son about his experiences with a form of Asperger syndrome. Keri and I shortly shall be incorporating this video and her insights about parenting such a special child into a blog piece as a first step in assisting her in writing a book to share her knowledge.


 

App GenerationCarroll ReflectionsCarroll University USACurious DavidJane Hart's Top 100 Learning Tools

OMG: Discovering What My Research Assistants Are REALLY Doing…

Phoumany

Bookwhacked

Two soon-to-be graduates Phoumany and Ryan

Two soon-to-be graduates Phoumany and Ryan

I’m going to miss these two student friends/students/best teachers/fellow conspirators when they depart campus on May 11 as graduates. Thanks, Phoumany and Ryan for all the laughter and learning and for making my Carroll experiences more joyful.

Things we’ve done in Dr. Simpson’s Office Over the Past Few Years: (red items added by DumbleDave)

  1. Catalogued over 1,000 books (Dr. Simpson most likely has read them all!)
  2. Decorated the office for his birthday.
  3. Decorated every other holiday.
  4. Played Temple Run.
  5. We wrote a book!
  6. Played nose-goes when the phone rang.
  7. Learned how to use fountain pens.
  8. Created and Conducted Rogers Hospital Climate Survey.
  9. Almost got killed… multiple times.
  10. Utilized all furniture in the office.
  11. Became PC savy and MAC savy.
  12. Played with random trinkets.
  13. Conducted “Power of Ten” study.
  14.  Researched Purple People Eater

15. Helped Evaluate Carroll University’s Alumni  National Day of Service Food Drive

16. Wrote a winning grant to received IPads to develop a Virtual European Immersion course.

17. Tooled around with most of Jane Hart’s technology learning tools.

18. Made sure that Dr. Simpson ate his lunch.

19. Laughed; cried; cheered; booed.

20. Complained.



 

App GenerationCarroll ReflectionsCarroll University USACurious DavidDesk Top Publishing

Movenote Revisited

S-TEAM

Across my 35 years of teaching at Carroll I have been blessed to have highly skilled, patient, playful student research assistants who cheerfully and ably respond to my hurried, fly-by” task assignments such as “learn how to use Movenote and report back to me its potential value”. Thank you, student friends, for your support and for your being part of Dr. Simpson’s Neighborhood. Here is a result from our early explorations this year of the capabilities of Movenote –  Click on the link:  Angela and Amy Tutorial on Movenote.

Here is an example of what Angela learned THIS SEMESTER about how Movenote has evolved—Click on this link:  Much has improved!

 

 

I have much for which to be thankful as a professor. Especially I am thankful for the delightful opportunities to learn along with students such as these!