alumniClutterCurious DavidHappinessMeaning

Refocusing, Renewal, and “Hours longer we to bury was.”

 

Version 3Last night I took the time to wander and wonder outside our North Lake home with my camera taking pictures of the super moon.  The evening not only was beautiful but the act of having to focus and refocus my camera helped develop in me thoughts about the importance of focus and refocus in my life. Reflection and refocusing in one’s life for me is not only good but imperative.

I’m sitting at my desk for the moment between the time of administering two exams. How best should I use this “free” time? Too often I use the time to start yet another project. Instead this time I am reflecting.  I also am trying to dictate this blog piece using my Nuance Dragon Professional software. It surely has improved in terms of its accuracy and ease of use, and it is far past time for me to learn how to use it to my advantage.

Still, it has its limitations (or perhaps I still need to learn better its features).

“Hours longer we to bury was.”  That gibberish was what the software produced when I attempted to quote something I read in Latin almost 50 years ago:  “ars longa, vita brevis.” Art is long; life is short.

I had forgotten that the passage was originally attributed to Hippocrates. I embrace his  more complete quotation:

“Life is short,and art long,opportunity fleeting,experimentations perilous,and judgement difficult.”

So much to learn; so little time. So much beauty to discover and to appreciate.

p1080434

So many perilous experimentations to be risked in order to live more fully. So many difficult judgments to make. So many difficult conversations needed.  Yet, I continue to believe that I have been blessed by being given the opportunity to teach and to learn continuously.

Time to return to the classroom—renewed…

p1080637

Curious David

A Benevolent Curmudgeon and a Bright Emerging Star Reflect on LinkedIn: Revised

 

David (AKA The Benevolent Curmudgeon):

dscn4331In several prior posts about my experiences with LinkedIn, I have pondered and sought advice about how someone like me (with one foot in academe and the other in the business world) might most profit from and contribute to LinkedIn. Since those postings, I have joined several linked in groups, explored some of LinkedIn’s premium features such “learning”( aka Lynda.com), looked at the usefulness of SlideShare (here is a recent posting there by Jane Hart), participated in some LinkedIn surveys by becoming a member of the “LinkedIn Premium Insiders Community, selectively and systematically expanded my network, subscribed to RSS feeds, explored using hashtags for my postings, and read and responded to a number of posts. I have found particularly rewarding the good work of Maya Pope-Chappell, Education and millennial Editor of LinkedIn. She writes well and has championed efforts 1) to encourage cross-fertilization of ideas from higher education and the business world and 2) to increase opportunities for involvement by college students. See, for example, her Lynda.com screencast targeted for college and university students about how to write for LinkedIn.

Things I dislike about LinkedIn:

  • I still find the “post publishing platform” primitive and user-unfriendly—inferior to that of WordPress (though far superior to Yammer’s). My work-around has been to write LinkedIn blog pieces (targeted for a LinkedIn audience)


on another platform and then migrate them.

  • I find many of the articles far two “formulaic” for my taste: Promises of THE “seven”proven ways to increase my (fill in the buzzword). [I’ve ranted written about my love distaste  thoughts about “buzzwords” here and here.]
  • I get annoyed by my inability to read some articles that look interesting to me unless I turn off my ad blockers or “white list” the target website.

For a refreshingly “non peevish” take on LinkedIn, I invited one of my research assistants, Alison Lehman who is quite knowledgable about LinkedIn (she wrote about it in her first book) to share here present perspective about it. She is most enthusiastic about it even as she approaches the time of her university graduation. I, as always, learned a few things from her.

aaeaaqaaaaaaaaaaaaaajgq5nwm2zmyxltg0mzatndazzc04mmjjltdkzdgzmzyxzgzlnq

Rapidly growing and expanding, LinkedIn is an online, social networking site for individuals to connect with other professionals and post their professional accomplishments, experiences, and volunteer activities. With the technological advances that exist today, employers are not only looking at an individual’s hard copy resume but they are also turning to LinkedIn to put a face to the name, as well as seeing how the individual presents themselves online. LinkedIn is an interactive website to compile education history, past experiences, skills, interests, completed projects, and various other professional expertise; pretty much an online resume for others to see. With connecting and providing experiences, this opens the door to future jobs and valuable professional relationships. Creating a LinkedIn profile can help grow connections in the business world and displays qualifications and experience for jobs.

Getting Started:

To create a LinkedIn profile, an individual can go to the LinkedIn website and create their profile with an email address and password. An individual is then prompted to insert information about themselves, such as a brief autobiography, past education experience, and professional work history. Additionally, information can be entered about volunteer experiences or  organizations’ they care about, institutions they are affiliated with, certifications received, and a list of personal skills. LinkedIn will then organize all of the information into an organized profile page. The user can customize where each section of information will fall (e.g. either at the top of the profile or farther down). Other individuals can also endorse the skills you have listed on your profile. This feature is a quick way for connections to validate that the individual is well qualified in the skills they have listed.

Users are able to create an online profile with as much professional information about themselves as they see pertinent. LinkedIn creates a profile composed of an individual’s professional history, education, and achievements. Similar to a resume, but in an online format, LinkedIn allows other individuals to review your professional endeavors and education. Through LinkedIn, users potentially are more able to find jobs, locate other individuals in their field of study, and discover business and volunteer opportunities. Especially for college students, LinkedIn can be a viable way to make professional connections, search for internships or positions in one’s desired career path, and make connections with other professionals who can give valuable advice or guidance for the future.

Getting the most out of LinkedIn:

The feature that most individuals see on LinkedIn is your picture, name, and professional headline. Since most attention is placed on these three elements, they should be strategically created to help emphasize your field of study and strengths. While a professional headshot is ideal, professional photographers can be expensive to hire. The LinkedIn picture does not need to be taken by a professional but it should be a professional-looking headshot. The professional headline should be crafted to include keywords related to your field of study/work. These keywords can help other professionals find your profile and explore your experiences and strengths. This 120 character opportunity can be used as a mini pitch to quickly showcase your area of expertise and skill set.

Since LinkedIn allows users to compile a profile with sections ranging from education experience, publications, projects, interests, and many more, as much of the profile should be filled out as possible to utilize the ability to display abilities and interests to other professionals. Putting skills and accomplishments on LinkedIn is a way for others to recognize your strengths and reach out when jobs or projects seem relevant. Some of these sections include adding a professional profile picture of oneself and even, if one chooses, adding a cover photo that will be displayed behind the profile. With the ability to include summaries, experiences, and educational history, these allow the user to demonstrate and expand on their qualifications and professional achievements. Some of these sections are education, contact information, professional industry, volunteer experiences, and certifications. Completing all the LinkedIn sections allows individuals to both keep track of their experiences and accomplishments in their life, and also helps showcase these talents and skills to other individuals. But remember, do not just throw down quick information to complete each section. Instead, think strategically about word choice and the way you want to communicate your information to others.

Once the profile is up and running, it is time to make connections. By adding connections with other individuals, others will be able to see and explore your profile. When adding connections,  some individuals add anyone to increase their connection numbers.  Others prefer to make connections only with individuals whom they personally know. If one simply has hundreds of connections but does not take advantage of what these connections could offer, it defeats the purpose. Connections help individuals stay in contact with old classmates, colleagues or friends, make professional connections for future jobs, receive advice from others in their field of study, and share information among groups. With the email address used to create a LinkedIn profile, LinkedIn will automatically suggest connections to individuals in your email list who have a LinkedIn account with that similar email. One can also look for connections by searching for their name, a company name, a specific industry, or a school name. There are so many benefits that LinkedIn provides, but it is up to the individual to leverage how best to take advantage of these features.

LinkedIn also allows individuals to create a custom URL to their profile. The URL that comes with a profile is normally a group of random letters and numbers. In just a couple of minutes, one can create a custom URL, such as his/her name. If the name is already taken, one can try to add a middle initial or add his/her middle name completely. Also, one way to get involved on LinkedIn is through groups. Individuals can join professional groups which share information or advice among members, and post or search for jobs. Groups allow individuals to communicate between one another and to expand their knowledge. It is a great way to meet new individuals and make new connections. Anyone with a LinkedIn profile can create a group that can be customized to the topic they are interested in. LinkedIn provides a free service, but it also has an option for individuals to pay for more features. For college students, the free version of LinkedIn is a great way to put together an online resume, but also get a start exploring the professional world for after graduation.

LinkedIn for Carroll University Students:

In addition, LinkedIn has a feature called “find alumni”. This feature allows one to look for alumni that attended their same university. After selecting this tab, a page is brought up with all the alumni and that can be sorted by their college concentrations, current area living, interests, skills or current job placement.  This feature allows one to see where your peers are currently living in the world and how they are using their skills in their career paths. Also, individuals can look at other professionals’ profiles to get tips and advice on opportunities alumni pursued to obtain jobs or even possible organizations to could work for. The find alumni tools is a great starting point to explore possible career options, connect with alumni that share similar interests, or get inspiration for volunteer activities or clubs to join while still at the university.

LinkedIn is very beneficial for business purposes. One may want to find a job sooner than the usual applying to multiple different places. One is able to put just his/her information out on this website and have others looking for them. Their information is on there just as if their resume would be. People are able to look up certain students, adults, business partners, etc. on LinkedIn and possibly find someone they could potentially hire for a position they have opening for at their business. Also, LinkedIn is very useful in connecting with others you may have known from a past job experience, high school, college, etc.

Curious David

Booked Until Mid January …

dscn4332

Though good literature is timeless and much nonfiction is time-dependent, it would appear that my backlog of pleasure reading is in need of more time than the hour or so I devote to reading before falling asleep! Alas, this weekend is the annual University Lake barn sale where I habitually succumb to walking away with several grocery bags stuffed with even more to read.

Among the books (some of which are pictured above) I plan to have read before 2nd semester begins in mid January are the following:

  1. Charles Duhigg’s Smarter, Faster, Better: The Science of Being Productive in Life and Business and also his The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business. I try to read things of this sort because of my partnership in Schneider Consulting and out of interest in writing something like this. Greg, Jane, and I keep talking about publishing some of our accumulated wisdom from consulting the past 30 years.
  2. Cixin Liu’s Death’s End. I read the first two books of this science fiction trilogy and have eagerly awaited more than a year for the translation  of the third volume. I try to read several works from global authors every year and at the time I read the first book, I was under the understanding the Carroll was expecting an influx of students from China.
  3. Ann Patchett’s Commonwealth. I admire and envy her way with words.
  4. Jonathan Safran Foer’s novels Here I Am and  Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close. I tonight will finish his creative first novel Everything Is Illuminated.
  5. Robert Sternberg’s What Universities Can Be: A New Model for Active Concerned Citizenship and Ethical Leadership.I’ve always admired Sternberg’s depth of thinking and once had the pleasure reviewing his book on research dealing with wisdom. This year Carroll’s overarching theme is “Citizenship.”
  6. The Dalai Lama and Desmond Tutu’s The Book of Joy: Lasting Happiness in a Changing World. I deeply admire both men.
  7. Alan Moore’s Jerusalem.
  8. Maria Konnikova’s The Confidence Game: Why We Fall for It Every Time. 
  9. Kennth Mikkelson’s (with whom I just connected on LinkedIn): The NeoGeneralist: Where You Go is Who You Are
  10. J. K. Rowling’s: Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them: A Screen Play

And of course, for the next six weeks I continue to read, learn from, and interact online with the author Jane Hart of MODERN WORKPLACE LEARNING: A RESOURCE BOOK FOR L&D. It is a fascinating and a very new reading experience for me to be interacting with the author and a number of fellow readers across the world as we read, discuss, and try to apply the ideas in her book. So much value is added to the printed copy I bought by my  also having an online copy which I can annotate, explore the links and references, and perhaps even through my participation “refresh” it with ideas.

Lego, ergo sum.



Curious David

What have I learned today? LESSONS FROM DR. SIMPSON’S NEIGHBORHOOD

photo

  • I can be amazingly productive and creative when I have protected time and when I disconnect from the computer!
  • Surrounding oneself with bright, playful younger team members in Dr. Simpson’s Neighborhood can result in major learning experiences. Reverse mentoring is highly rewarding.
  • Many of my better ideas are incubated while I am engaged in mundane, mindless activities such as cleaning my office. I also have excavated  rediscovered a number of useful learning tools (such as my Carroll COLLEGE pencils!)
  • I am learning many new things by interacting with fellow workplace workshop co-learners across the globe.
  • I have rediscovered the iPad App that allows me to see what time it is in Germany, Ghana, and the United Kingdom to increase the likelihood of a Skype/Facetime interaction with my newly discovered co-learners.
  • Today is “National Coffee Day!”
  • The analytic data on LinkedIn suggests that some of the things I post there there are actually viewed.
  • The music that my students listen to is not much different from what I used to listen to. Alas, Sir Paul’s voice did show some wear when I heard him this summer at Milwaukee’s Summerfest.
  • I am blessed with wonderful academic colleagues both within Psychology and University-wide.
  • There is so much more to learn. Maybe our emeritus Chairman of the Board is correct in his playful suggestion that I should continue to teach another 25 years. So much to learn. Therefore, one must capitalize on the many ways of learning.




Curious David

Applying Modern Workplace Learning Lessons

Throughout my almost four decades of teaching I have tried to build bridges. Bridges across the Kindergarten to Higher Education divide. Bridges among different global communities. Bridges between academic and corporate cultures. I’m now in the 2nd week of participating in a workshop led by The United Kingdon’s Jane Hart. The foundation of this workshop is her book Modern Workplace Learning: A resource book for L & D. How refreshing it is to interact with the author (whom I have admired and corresponded with for almost 10 years) and to develop learning relationships with individuals across the world. Based on things I’ve learned and reflected upon to date, I have “connected” with a workshop participant on LinkedIn, incorporated some of the exchanged ideas into my interactions with my student research team, and am having so much fun!

We are encouraged to keep learning logs this week and to share them with fellow workshop participants. One assignment also is to share a screenshot of our journal. One co-participant has already renewed my interest in revisiting EverNote (Thank you, Jennifer R!). Jane’s Chapter 34 whetted my curiosity to take a look at OneNote (though I’ll consult also with my student research team about its utility).

Here is brief screen cast created by student research (and author) Lizzie Hof how we use DayOne as a “learning log.”




Curious David

What are you reading today? What have you learned today? (Part 1)

101_0179

I’m proctoring my first two exams of the academic year (Statistics and Experimental Design) so I have a protected five hour block for reading and for writing. I’ll have another such window of opportunity while my wife is in the dentist’s office for an hour later today. My Ipad will accompany me there.

First I glance at my Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook accounts. Looks like it is time to refine my Twitter filters. Can it really be that I have created over 1500 Tweets??  Do I still want to follow Edward Snowden? Jane Hart? Time to winnow—or to destroy the evidence:) I’ll revisit whom and what I follow as my interests and needs change. I’ll have to refresh my memory on what I and my students have written about Twitter. I send myself a note about which articles I want to read in depth or to share.

I’ll seek some counsel from my student research team. They surprised me the other day by indicating that they found Twitter a useful tool that they would like to learn more about. I fire off an email to them and am pleased that three of them are already on-board awaiting assignments—at 8:15 a.m.

Team2016b

Simpson Research Team 2016-2017

I peruse my email accounts briefly trying to identify what most deserves or needs my attention. I quickly visually scan  the online version of the Waukesha Freeman with special attention to articles about Carroll; the Milwaukee Journal business section; and the Chronicle of Higher Education. I am delighted and impressed to see a draft stored on Google drive of an article written by one of my research assistants since we checked in this morning.  It compares Skype and Face Time as communication tools.  Well done, Alison! It was no accident that these students wrote their first book last year with only the slightest supervision from me. It will be interesting to see if they accept my challenge about advancing to the next level in developing their talent.

Time for a coffee break and a team meeting. We briefly meet between exams. I share with them a few projects that I would welcome their involvement in, and I share what I have learned today while exploring LinkedIn and Yammer. I learn so much FROM them. I grab several manuscripts dealing with “brain training” to read while I proctor exam # 2. Several Carroll alumni researchers share my interest in this topic and I want to keep up with them. Learning never ends.

 

Curious David

My Top Learning Tools (2016)

I’ve successfully loaded the Sierra OS upgrade to my Macs and determined which of my apps still:) work. It’s time to cast my ballot in Jane Hart’s 10th international survey about favorite learning tools. You can find her solicitation for votes here.

This year she invites us to categorize our use of each tool as to whether we primarily use it in education (E),for workplace learning (W), and or for  personal and professional learning (P). She also shared to the members of the “Supporting Everyday Workplace Learning” workshop that I am taking with her for the next eight weeks her Top 10 Learning Tools  and those of three of her ITA colleagues, Clark Quinn, Harold Jarche, and Charles Jennings. I found it interesting to benchmark my choices against theirs. Read More

Curious David

Confessions…

 

photoIt’s the first week of a new semester and I’m preparing for my PSY303 Experimental Social Psychology class.  I’ve written extensively in the past about teaching such a course. As I wind down (or wind up), I’m attempting to re-examine what, how, and why I teach each of my courses.

At the end of this week I’ll password protect blog posts entitled “Confessions” as I use them within my PSY303 class to develop student critical thinking and writing. Contact me if you’d like reading permission to view or participate in this  project.

Confession # 1: That is an old photo from my Social Psychology Network  Web Page.  I truly admire how Scott Plous has developed this web page and has maintained its excellence across the years. I also continue to be sympathetic with its over arching mission:”Social Psychology Network is an educational organization whose mission is to promote peace, social justice, and sustainable living through public education, research, and the advancement of psychology.”

Confession #2: I just now renewed my SPN donation for 2016 and 2017:) Thank you SPN for all you do.

I invite former students (e.g. Deana Julka, Cathy Carnot-Bond,Mark Klinger, Jennifer Welbourne, Pam Propsom, and Terry Kott) and social psychologists (that’s you Tara J. Schmidt and Denise Guastello:)) among many others) to share with me their experiences as social psychologists or who draw upon social psychological principles in their lives (like you Mike Schwerin and Michelle Braun).

 

Curious David

What are YOUR favorite technology learning tools?

lisa arveson
What are your favorite technology learning tools? Now (until September 23) is a good time to send your recommendations to Jane Hart (see this link) as she for the 10th year finishes compiling recommendations made by learning professionals.  Jane will be organizing her report into three broad categories of learning tools:

  1. Top 100 Tools for Education – those used  in schools, colleges, and universities
  2. Top 100 Tools for Workplace Learning – those used in training, for performance support, and social collaboration.
  3. Top 100 Tools for Personal & Professional Learning – those used for self-organized learning.

Before the academic year I formally and systematically review the technology learning tools that I judge to be most useful to my teaching and learning effectiveness.

In the next couple of weeks I shall be sharing my recommendations and the results of my revisiting my most useful desktop tools with particular emphasis on those that enhance my writing/ publishing/ screencasting capabilities.

I now usually also give my research assistants an opportunity to give me their recommendations. Last year they wrote and published their first book about their favorite tools. As soon as they are settle in I’ll share some of their new good work and their recommendations.

2016-09-07_12-24-39

Gotta run. I hear bag pipes!

 

 

alumniBloggingCarroll College WaukeshaCarroll ReflectionsCarroll University

And So It Begins….

DSCN4188 DSCN4189

I usually arrive on campus to an empty parking lot. Today was no exception despite the road construction, school buses, and famous Waukesha trains.

The construction workers are already hard at work completing the new science building. New students adorned in their new tee shirts are exploring the campus making sure that they can find their classrooms.

An early morning phone call to ITS is quite successful both in resolving some traditional first of semester computer issues and in renewing some friendships. Daniel will be starting his 20th year here. Chris is a Carroll graduate. Both exemplify the authenticity in my belief that Carroll Cares.

Much mundane to accomplish today before the Cubs game. I hope to get a lot of serious writing done this year, but that block of time will not be available today.

Several of my student assistants have threatened promised to stop by. As I’ve written many times I’ve been blessed across the years with over 50 superb student assistants. It is fun and rewarding learning together. They keep me young(er). Tomorrow, rain or shine, I’ll answer the call of the bagpiper as the new freshman class is introduced to the Carroll academic world.

Thanks to all you alumni for sharing via LinkedIn and Facebook your responses to my earlier blog posts of this year. It’s nice knowing that I have a reader or two:)

dscn4190 dscn4191 dscn4192 dscn4193 dscn4194 dscn4195

dscn4197 dscn4198 dscn4199 dscn4200